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10 March 2015

Time to act on climate change

Time to act on climate change

Photo credit: Maya Williams

The party pledges ahead of the election in May are flooding in, including promises to tackle climate change. People are using this opportunity to make themselves heard on the global issue.

On 7 March, thousands joined a Time to Act demonstration in London to apply political pressure and state that the time for words and promises is over, and that now is the time for action.

Protestors were calling for investment in renewable energy, savings in energy and the cutting of emissions.

Christian environment charity
Operation Noah hosted an ecumenical climate service before the national climate march at St Mary le Strand Church, which hosted over 200 people.

Ruth Jarman of Operation Noah said: "2015 is a big year for the climate. The climate talks in Paris this December are crucial if we're going to protect all that we love. And the election in May needs to be informed by science and justice, not fear and greed."

Alliance member Tearfund continues to push forward the climate campaign and remains committed to working with local churches helping poor communities to adapt to the impacts of climate change, while speaking out to world leaders to reduce global emissions levels and explore innovative means of sourcing the money needed to help communities to adapt.

Paul Cook, Tearfund's advocacy director said: "The Church needs to speak out and pray for governments to act, remind people there's more to life than the amount of stuff we own, serve people feeling the impact of climate change, and take care of the world God made.  

"From our long experience of serving people in some of the world's poorest countries, we know that vulnerable people are already feeling the effects of a changing climate. It's only going to get worse unless we can, all of us, reduce our impact on our planet.

"We believe that all the development progress we have made to this point - including halving poverty since 1990 - will be for nothing unless we switch to a just and sustainable economy that drives down poverty without wrecking the planet.

"David Cameron must encourage the other world leaders to join with him in setting ambitions high and laying the foundations for a fair, ambitious and legally binding global climate deal in 2015."

St Paul's Institute and the Diocese of London are hosting a public event on climate change at St Paul's Cathedral on 23 April to explore the behavioural and organisational changes needed to mitigate climate change.

Topics will look at the role local communities might play, and how can each of us contribute and how to build the political will needed to instigate effective change.

The speakers include the Bishop of Salisbury and Baroness Worthington and afterwards organisations, artists and campaigners come together to showcase a range of cultural expressions and responses to climate change.